that girl allison

I'm Allison. I see a ton of theatre. I'm a fan of Green Day, Ted Leo & the Pharmacists, Weezer, Oasis, Adam Rapp, Emily Giffin, and Shakespeare. I run sometimes, and do yoga always.

Email me at:
thatgirlallison08 at gmail dot com

Tags ::
reviews // Green Day // theatre // books // dating // broadway // movies // food // recipes // cooking // off-broadway // restaurants // upper west side // upper east side // american idiot

Recent Tweets @thatgirlallison
Posts tagged "leap of faith"

The New York Times critics released their picks for the Tonys quite early (so it seemed) which also included who they thought were snubbed. These are always fun to read.

I’ve seen almost all of the best musical/play nominees, except for Nice Work If You Can Get It which I still have yet to decide whether or not I want to pay nearly $40 to see it. Gershwin is an American legend, but he’s not anywhere near the top of my list of favorite  composers. So everyone’s anticipation can be put to rest, as I now present to you with my opinions on who was nominated, who I think should win, and who I think was tragically overlooked.

Best Musical: The nominees include Once, NewsiesLeap of Faith, and Nice Work If You Can Get It. Who do I think should win? Once. It is an artistic masterpiece. It is visually stunning, emotionally moving, and the score is one of the best out there. What will win? If Once doesn’t get it, Newsies most certainly will. It has a worthy opponent, but there’s something about Once that strikes a deeper chord with me. I think it’s more universal, plus it needs the win to do well on tour. What should’ve been nominated? Hands down: GhostGhost is visually stunning and I was never bored for one minute of the two and a half hours. Leap of Faith was, with all due respect, a visually horrendous bore. 

Best Play: This category is going to be tough. Each nominee is fantastic: Clybourne ParkVenus in FurPeter and the Starcatcher, and Other Desert Cities. My first instinct is to say that Clybourne Park will take this one, but there is a chance that Other Desert Cities or possibly Peter and the Starcatcher might slide in. Although I absolutely loved Venus in Fur, I don’t think it has touring potential and it’s a limited run, so the award wouldn’t help it in any way. What should have been nominated was The Lyons. I find this show hilarious but maybe not all of the nominating committee has had a Jewish grandmother before. Or Theresa Rebeck’s Seminar definitely deserved a nod as well. (This snubbing was, I think, her punishment for writing Smash.)

Best Book of a Musical: The nominees are Lysistrata JonesOnceNice Work If You Can Get It, and Newsies. Given that Once and Newsies aren’t original books, so to speak, I’m going say that Lysistrata Jones has a pretty good chance of snagging this one much to everyone’s surprise. Is their book the best? No, not at all. The show didn’t work very well on Broadway. Or Newsies could very well start sweeping the awards and take this as well. What should have been nominated? Bonnie and Clyde. Sue me, but I really enjoyed that show and I thought the book was engaging the entire time. 

Best Original Score: The nominees are Bonnie and ClydeOne Man, Two Guv’norsNewsies, and Peter and the Starcatcher. I would love for Bonnie and Clyde to take this one, but it never will because the voters hate Wildhorn too much.  Newsies will probably sweep it because the other two are plays and that would be kind of sad for a play to take Best Original Score. (Though the score in One Man, Two Guv’nors was quite good.) What should have been nominated? Wonderland. (No, just kidding!) I don’t think there were any other truly memorable great scores written in the past season. I don’t remember the music to Lysistrata Jones. But part of me remembers a lot of the music from Newsies being in the movie too, and in that case, Once should also have been able to be nominated for Best Original Score.    

Best Revival of a Play: The nominees include Death of a SalesmanThe Best ManWit, and Master Class. First a huge congratulations is in order to MTC for scoring two nominations in this category. Each one of these nominees was a pleasure to sit through (though you never quite believed that Cynthia Nixon was a scholar in Wit), but I’m going to say that Death of a Salesman gets this one, if the voters don’t decide to be total star-fuckers for ratings and award The Best Man instead. Although there are a fair number of stars in Salesman too, but I just thought Salesman was better than The Best Man. I don’t think there were any shows that should’ve been nominated in this category. 

Best Revival of a Musical: The nominees this year are EvitaFolliesThe Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess, and Jesus Christ Superstar.  Jesus Christ Superstar and Follies were my favorites this year, and I’m going to put my money on Follies winning. It was a favorite this year, but Porgy and Bess was also a beautiful production, though it bored me to tears, and I could see it sneaking in from behind and taking the award.

Alright, the rest of these will be short…. Click through!

Read More

It’s not uncommon for a number of shows to post closing notices after the TONY Award nominations are announced.  Producers wait with their fingers crossed (if their show isn’t grossing healthy dollar amounts) and hope that their show will be honored with a nomination for Best Play/Musical. This nod can provide a bit of a boost initially and help keep it going until the actual awards in June.

If your show isn’t doing so well though? The slight boost that the nod could possibly provide might not be enough. Michael Riedel reported two weeks ago that the producers of Leap of Faith would need a minimum of $2 million to keep the show going through the beginning of June. Yes, Riedel is a gossip columnist, but he’s oftentimes correct on these things (even columnists have their sources) and from a producing perspective, that number doesn’t seem very far fetched. Thankfully the small chance of winning the TONY for Best Musical have not kept them from making, in my opinion, the right decision and they’ve decided to close this Sunday.

After being thoughtlessly snubbed by the nomination committee, Theresa Rebeck’s hysterical new play Seminar closed last Sunday, May 6th. I was really disappointed that I didn’t get the chance to see Jeff Goldblum in it. Perhaps it will tour? I think it’d be a hard sell on the road though. 

Last on the list thusfar is Magic/Bird. This play, unliked last season’s Lombardi, just couldn’t find it’s audience. Magic/Bird will shutter on May 12th after having been ignored for a nomination for Best Play. 

Those are the three on the list so far. Your guess is as good as mine for what’s on the Great White Way chopping block next.

A few weeks ago I’d bought a ticket from TDF for an early preview of Leap of Faith.  I had no idea what to expect, having never seen the movie, but I wanted to see Kendra Kassebaum and Raul Esparza onstage again so how bad could it be?

Leap of Faith is about a traveling con artist who parades around as a reverend with his “angels” and sister “saving” small towns of people by robbing them for all their worth until they hit a town called Sweet Water and he’s changed forever.

By all means, Leap of Faith is a well-written musical. I found that the book was written well, and the music was upbeat at the highs and depressing at the lows. For all it’s worth, there’s nothing actually wrong with Leap of Faith. I just found it to be dull, like Memphis. I know not every new musical has to be groundbreaking, but is it so bad that I’d like them to be? I know there are only so many “new” things that a writer can propose to be done onstage before they’re called crazy. Anyways, there are a few songs here and there that I really enjoyed and there’s an effect at the end that you can’t help but smile at too.

The cast is all around fantastic. They’re strong actors, singers, and dancers. Leslie Odom Jr. steals the show more than once.  Kendra Kassebaum is funny, charming, and as always, has a voice to die for. Raul Esparza didn’t amaze me until the second to last song, his “soliloquy.”  That song was really unbelievable, but he never amazed me during the rest of the show. 

If you’re looking to see this movie brought to life onstage, or just a fun night at the theatre, Leap of Faith is for you.

A few weeks ago I’d bought a ticket from TDF for an early preview of Leap of Faith.  I had no idea what to expect, having never seen the movie, but I wanted to see Kendra Kassebaum and Raul Esparza onstage again so how bad could it be?

Leap of Faith is about a traveling con artist who parades around as a reverend with his “angels” and sister “saving” small towns of people by robbing them for all their worth until they hit a town called Sweet Water and he’s changed forever.

By all means, Leap of Faith is a well-written musical. I found that the book was written well, and the music was upbeat at the highs and depressing at the lows. For all it’s worth, there’s nothing actually wrong with Leap of Faith. I just found it to be dull, like Memphis. I know not every new musical has to be groundbreaking, but is it so bad that I’d like them to be? I know there are only so many “new” things that a writer can propose to be done onstage before they’re called crazy. Anyways, there are a few songs here and there that I really enjoyed and there’s an effect at the end that you can’t help but smile at too.

The cast is all around fantastic. They’re strong actors, singers, and dancers. Leslie Odom Jr. steals the show more than once.  Kendra Kassebaum is funny, charming, and as always, has a voice to die for. Raul Esparza didn’t amaze me until the second to last song, his “soliloquy.”  That song was really unbelievable, but he never amazed me during the rest of the show. 

If you’re looking to see this movie brought to life onstage, or just a fun night at the theatre, Leap of Faith is for you.