that girl allison

I'm Allison. I see a ton of theatre. I'm a fan of Green Day, Ted Leo & the Pharmacists, Weezer, Oasis, Adam Rapp, Emily Giffin, and Shakespeare. I run sometimes, and do yoga always.

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thatgirlallison08 at gmail dot com

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Posts tagged "jesus christ superstar"

I was going through my theatre-related posts of this year and I couldn’t pick just 10. Since this is my blog and I make the rules, I decided to do 13. 

1. Bring It On: I had my doubts and reservations about this musical, and maybe I’m a little biased after working on it for a few months, but I loved this show. It was visually stunning, fun, and not totally void of meaning. It had a good meaning overall: Life goes on after high school. I love this show, I’m sad it closed yesterday, and I will definitely miss it.

2. Merrily We Roll Along @ Encores: I went to the final performance and it was my first time having seen it - though I’d heard the music before. The cast was fantastic, as was the material. The atmosphere was also electric. Everyone was so excited to be there.

3. The Other Josh Cohen: This was just a gem of a show. I’m so glad I got to see it.

4. Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? revival: I had reservations about this too, having seen the last revival with Kathleen Turner, but upon being offered a free ticket, who was I to turn it down? It ended up being pretty incredible. It was probably one of the best things to open on Broadway this fall.

5. Harvey @ Studio 54: A supposed allegory for homosexuality in the mid-20th century, Jim Parsons killed his roll and this show. Loved it.

6. The Bad and the Better (by The Amoralists): I love The Amoralists. This show was a complex story with many layers and a huge cast. It was pretty epic. I don’t know how they afforded to do it, but they definitely did.

7. James Corden in One Man, Two Guv’nors: I loved this play and I probably loved it because James Corden was so goddamn funny. He absolutely killed onstage. He deserved his TONY Award.

8. The Lyons: I saw this play off-Broadway and loved, and saw it twice more on Broadway. I loved it every single time. Probably because Linda Lavin reminded me of my late Jewish grandmother. And… Michael Esper.

9. Once's Transfer to Broadway: I think the producers transfered this show well. Not much got lost in the bigger space in the Jacobs Theatre and the spirit of the show remained intact. I loved it off-Broadway and it made me cry (twice) on Broadway. I wasn't sure whether transferring this show was the right thing to do, but I'm happy that they're doing well ($1 million+/week).  

10. Tribes: This was an off-Broadway show not to be missed. It deserved every bit of praise it received. I loved it a lot possibly because the lead was hearing-impaired so it made it that much more believable, but who knows. It had a healthy run at The Barrow Group and is now going to LA. 

11. Carrie: A cult classic that only existed in bootleg form before MCC revived it. It was cheesy and the music wasn’t so stellar, and I wished there’d been more blood, but it was an experience to be had and seen. I’m definitely glad I paid $20 to sit in the second row. 

12. Jesus Christ Superstar's Resurrection: The revival in 2000 wasn't so good - except for Tony Vincent, duh - but I loved, loved, loved this one, which transferred from the Stratford Theatre Festival. It felt like a digital update, but the incredible rock score was still the intact and the cast was incredible. I don't care what anyone says, Josh Young was an incredible Judas. I saw this revival twice and my only regret is that I wished I'd seen it again!

13. Assistance: I was an assistant when I saw this so I definitely related. It was hysterical, vulgar, and exaggerated (though I’m sure it’s not so exaggerated for some people). The ending also wins for ‘most unrelated and random ending ever.’ Also: Michael Esper.

That’s my run-down for 2012. There were a dozen or more shows that I saw and didn’t write about (because I suck sometimes), but I’ll try to be better about writing about EVERYTHING in 2013. What were your top theatre moments in 2012? Happy new year!

The New York Times critics released their picks for the Tonys quite early (so it seemed) which also included who they thought were snubbed. These are always fun to read.

I’ve seen almost all of the best musical/play nominees, except for Nice Work If You Can Get It which I still have yet to decide whether or not I want to pay nearly $40 to see it. Gershwin is an American legend, but he’s not anywhere near the top of my list of favorite  composers. So everyone’s anticipation can be put to rest, as I now present to you with my opinions on who was nominated, who I think should win, and who I think was tragically overlooked.

Best Musical: The nominees include Once, NewsiesLeap of Faith, and Nice Work If You Can Get It. Who do I think should win? Once. It is an artistic masterpiece. It is visually stunning, emotionally moving, and the score is one of the best out there. What will win? If Once doesn’t get it, Newsies most certainly will. It has a worthy opponent, but there’s something about Once that strikes a deeper chord with me. I think it’s more universal, plus it needs the win to do well on tour. What should’ve been nominated? Hands down: GhostGhost is visually stunning and I was never bored for one minute of the two and a half hours. Leap of Faith was, with all due respect, a visually horrendous bore. 

Best Play: This category is going to be tough. Each nominee is fantastic: Clybourne ParkVenus in FurPeter and the Starcatcher, and Other Desert Cities. My first instinct is to say that Clybourne Park will take this one, but there is a chance that Other Desert Cities or possibly Peter and the Starcatcher might slide in. Although I absolutely loved Venus in Fur, I don’t think it has touring potential and it’s a limited run, so the award wouldn’t help it in any way. What should have been nominated was The Lyons. I find this show hilarious but maybe not all of the nominating committee has had a Jewish grandmother before. Or Theresa Rebeck’s Seminar definitely deserved a nod as well. (This snubbing was, I think, her punishment for writing Smash.)

Best Book of a Musical: The nominees are Lysistrata JonesOnceNice Work If You Can Get It, and Newsies. Given that Once and Newsies aren’t original books, so to speak, I’m going say that Lysistrata Jones has a pretty good chance of snagging this one much to everyone’s surprise. Is their book the best? No, not at all. The show didn’t work very well on Broadway. Or Newsies could very well start sweeping the awards and take this as well. What should have been nominated? Bonnie and Clyde. Sue me, but I really enjoyed that show and I thought the book was engaging the entire time. 

Best Original Score: The nominees are Bonnie and ClydeOne Man, Two Guv’norsNewsies, and Peter and the Starcatcher. I would love for Bonnie and Clyde to take this one, but it never will because the voters hate Wildhorn too much.  Newsies will probably sweep it because the other two are plays and that would be kind of sad for a play to take Best Original Score. (Though the score in One Man, Two Guv’nors was quite good.) What should have been nominated? Wonderland. (No, just kidding!) I don’t think there were any other truly memorable great scores written in the past season. I don’t remember the music to Lysistrata Jones. But part of me remembers a lot of the music from Newsies being in the movie too, and in that case, Once should also have been able to be nominated for Best Original Score.    

Best Revival of a Play: The nominees include Death of a SalesmanThe Best ManWit, and Master Class. First a huge congratulations is in order to MTC for scoring two nominations in this category. Each one of these nominees was a pleasure to sit through (though you never quite believed that Cynthia Nixon was a scholar in Wit), but I’m going to say that Death of a Salesman gets this one, if the voters don’t decide to be total star-fuckers for ratings and award The Best Man instead. Although there are a fair number of stars in Salesman too, but I just thought Salesman was better than The Best Man. I don’t think there were any shows that should’ve been nominated in this category. 

Best Revival of a Musical: The nominees this year are EvitaFolliesThe Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess, and Jesus Christ Superstar.  Jesus Christ Superstar and Follies were my favorites this year, and I’m going to put my money on Follies winning. It was a favorite this year, but Porgy and Bess was also a beautiful production, though it bored me to tears, and I could see it sneaking in from behind and taking the award.

Alright, the rest of these will be short…. Click through!

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In 2000, family friends took me to see the revival of Jesus Christ Superstar for my birthday. Tony Vincent and Maya Days were in it (as Judas and Mary, respectively), and being a Renthead at the time, I had to see it. Vincent and Days were the only redeeming qualities of that production. Though JCS has a fantastic score, the show, or at least that staging of it, left a ton to be desired.  It could’ve been my lack of enthusiasm for Christianity, the bible, or Jesus in general that left me cold too (it should be noted that I still share that lack of enthusiasm).

When I’d heard that the production at the Stratford Shakespeare Festival was great and transferring, I shook my head and silently wondered to myself, Why, oh, why are bringing this back? Hasn’t Broadway suffered enough recently? But thankfully, I can eat my hat, because I saw this most recent revival tonight and I really enjoyed it.

This production is incredibly different from the last revival which was basically glam rock. This production, though still heavy in electric guitar, the voices are much less hard and more pure musical theatre. The set is simple, and looks like the remnants of the set from Taboo plus a giant shining cross and two moveable staircases, but it works. There are a fair amount of projections (that set the day, time, place, etc) but they all work and add to the production in a positive way. The choreography is original and fitting (except for the erratic and distracting movement in What’s the Buzz - that should be fixed ASAP). The costumes are all appropriate to the time during which the show is set - unlike Vincent’s black leather jacket and jeans in the 2000 revival (for example).  The whipping scene is much LESS bloody than in 2000 and the song Superstar is staged incredibly differently - but it’s really, really fun to watch.  

But like I originally stated, every single voice on the stage of the Neil Simon Theatre is incredibly strong and gorgeous. Josh Young (Judas) sings (and looks like) Josh Groban but with a slight edge, and he is absolutely fantastic. He doesn’t rip a high note before the final verse of Superstar but I got over that (forward to 2:29 on this video to see what I mean - oh, hell, just watch the whole thing - it was the only reason to see the last revival). Paul Nolan (as jesus) may have had an even stronger voice the Glenn Carter did in 2000 and he looked a bit younger, which I thought added to the idea that Jesus was naive, because he was young.  Chilina Kennedy (Mary) had a beautiful voice and I thought she acted the role quite well.  

Other stand-outs in the cast include Tom Hewitt as Pontius Pilate - he doesn’t do much in the first act but he has tons of attitude and wears a crushed purple velvet suit in the second act which more than makes up for his lack of presence in the first act. Bruce Dow as King Herod is a totally different type of flamboyancy from his 2000 counterpart Paul Kandel but it works just as well, if not better. I also really enjoyed Mike Nadajewski as Peter.

What else can I say? Jesus Christ Superstar has an amazing score (probably my favorite of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s). The first act flies by in 55 minutes, and the second act is a tad shorter (although it feels a bit longer) and you’re out by 10pm. This newest revival is definitely worth seeing, even if you didn’t particularly enjoy the last revival (ahem). They have (student) rush tickets for $27 available the day-of, so you really have no excuse not to see it.

(photo credit: joan marcus)