that girl allison

I'm Allison. I see a ton of theatre. I'm a fan of Green Day, Ted Leo & the Pharmacists, Weezer, Oasis, Adam Rapp, Emily Giffin, and Shakespeare. I run sometimes, and do yoga always.

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thatgirlallison08 at gmail dot com

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Posts tagged "broadway"

So, The Cripple of Inishmaan is officially ending it’s fantastic run on July 20th. So just as a reminder, I present you all with this backstage tour with Daniel Radcliffe. Because who doesn’t love a backstage tour with a charismatic Brit?

And also: GIVE AWAY TIME! Reblog this post to win a copy of McDonagh’s plays, The Beauty Queen of Leenane and The Lonesome West.

Winner will be announced on May 10th!

Two weeks ago I got to see After Midnight, a dance revue playing at the Brooks Atkinson Theatre. Patti LaBelle was the current star and Dule Hill is always fabulous, as is Adriane Lenox, so I said why not!

It definitely deserved it’s Best Choreography TONY Award as the dancing was some of the best currently seen on Broadway. The singing was fabulous and it wove several different stories together which all came together at the very end, which I always like.

The cast was uniformly talented and did things with their bodies that you wouldn’t believe was possible. It’s a 95 minute journey back to old Harlem and the music of the day.

A few weeks ago I saw Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar & Grill at the Circle in the Square Theater starring the magnificent Audra McDonald. 

I knew nothing about Billie Holiday, nor did I know most of her song catalogue. It was all really pretty music and it was interesting to learn so much about this musical icon. 

Although McDonald is fabulous in everything she does, this included, but I left this show asking the same thing I did after End of the Rainbow, “Why?” As in, what was the point? 

I have no idea but I’ll just think of this a music history lesson and consider myself incredibly lucky to see Audra McDonald onstage again. 

This article, about Jessie Mueller, was really adorable. I highly suggest you read it. I’m sure she was totally excited to do this interview this morning after partying all night at the Carlyle ;)

The top moments from last night:

  1. A Gentleman’s Guide winning Best Musical. Obviously. (Full disclosure: my current office of employment works on the show so we were all incredibly happy.)
  2. Hedwig's performance. it was the best (GGLAM following a close second!). Hedwig is going to be sold out for their entire run soon. Mark my words.
  3. Lena & NPH winning their much deserved awards.
  4. Bryan Cranston and All the Way winning. Love that show. 
  5. Jessie Mueller’s acceptance speech. She was so sincere. 

Let’s see, last night’s WTF moments were as follows:

  1. The Wicked performance. That was the best they could do? Come on. Idina Menzel was in the house - throw her $10k to perform Defying Gravity. She’s a single mom now, so she could probably use the extra money, right? (No, I’m just being an asshole and I’m completely kidding. I think she makes upwards of $20k/week for If/Then, she’s fine.) This performance was a waste of time and a dishonor to a show that’s been on Broadway and selling out for 10 years. 
  2. The Music Man rapping. WHAT WAS THIS? Everyone at the party was speechless. We had no idea what was going on. 
  3. Nikki James in Les Miserables. Jesus christ. When is she scheduled to go on vacation because I cannot sit through a production of Les Miserables for three hours where Eponine sounds like a, and I quote, bag of dying babies. Miscast, indeed.  
  4. Celia Keenan-Bolger and The Glass Menagerie losing. WHAT? This was not supposed to happen. Wires got crossed somewhere.
  5. The opening number. Look, I get it, I read online today why Hugh Jackman was hopping, but even if I’d gotten the reference when I was watching it, it was still incredibly boring. It was one of the most lackluster openings in a while.

It wasn’t the best Tony’s, but it had it’s moments. I was exhausted and made my way home around midnight. It’s always worth the exhaustion. 

I’ve seen a bunch of shows in the last month. Unfortunately it’s been the week leading up to the Tonys/I’ve been a bit lazy so I haven’t had a chance to write about them yet.

I’m going to my company TONY party tonight with my lovely (semi-still new, I suppose?) coworkers and crossing our fingers that our shows take home all the awards.

This year the TONYs are such a toss up. I think Hedwig is a lock for revival and NPH is a lock for Best a Leading Actor, but who knows.

I’m also ashamed to admit that I’ve only seen one musical that’s nominated in the Best Musical category! I’m seeing After Midnight on Wednesday though so there’s that.

I’m sitting in a spa chair getting a long overdue pedicure in an admittedly weird lime green orange (for GGLAM!) from Essie. Then I’m going to watch a couple of episodes of Orange is the New Black, rest, do my hair, and get going to the party.

May the best show win…

Last night Kristen and I took in a performance of Act One at Lincoln Center’s Vivian Beaumont Theatre. Adapted from Moss Hart’s autobiography of the same name by James Lapine, Act One told the story of Moss Hart’s upbringing in the theatre. I haven’t read the book yet but I think I’ve seen a few copies lying around the office so I’ll have to borrow it soon. 

Santino Fontano was young Hart and he was fabulous, as he usually is. Tony Shalhoub was excellent as an older Moss Hart and the exceedingly strange George Kaufman. Andrea Martin was hilarious and heartwarming as Moss’ aunt (who is basically responsible for his life in the theatre) and Kaufman’s wife. And who doesn’t love an a supporting role played by the marvelous Chuck Cooper? Yeah, not a soul.

Albeit it being a bit long (it was almost 3 hours), it was an educating and entertaining night at the theatre that any theatre aficionado should make a point to see this season. 

Tickets were provided by the production but not in exchange for any review. 

Earlier this week I was invited to see The Cripple of Inishmaan, the new Martin McDonaugh play starring Daniel Radcliffe. I love McDonaugh (especially The Lieutenant of Inishmore, oh man!) so I was totally excited to see his latest to come to Broadway. And Daniel Radcliffe? I’ve never really been a Harry Potter fan, but he’s a great actor in everything else I’ve seen him in so I knew I wouldn’t be disappointed. 

About a young man named cripple Billy (Radcliffe) who’s being raised by his two “aunts” after his parent’s killed themselves. He hears of a Hollywood director casting a film in Inishmore and he goes to audition. The play is about the affect it has on himself, his aunts, and acquaintances, including a girl he secretly has a crush on (Helen). 

This is your typical McDonaugh play: dark, highly comical, and with a couple of twists. I love McDonaugh’s work, so I loved Inishmaan. Radcliffe was pure light onstage as Billy and I especially loved Sarah Greene as Helen. It maybe got a bit long towards the end of the second act, but it wasn’t bothersome. 

If you like Radcliffe, McDonaugh, or just dark comedies in general, definitely check on The Cripple of Inishmaan.

Tickets provided by the production. 

1) The amount of happiness that I have inside for when I do stupid little things like take out multiple bags of trash, hang out clothes, or unload the dishwasher is unbelievable. I hate doing these things so much but not doing them drives me insane too. Sometimes I think I was better at adulting when I was in college. 

2) I start my new job tomorrow. I’m not really nervous - more excited than anything else - and I’d like to keep it that way! This is the first time I’ve ever transitioned between jobs. Usually layoffs occurred, or an internship ended, but I’ve never had the privilege (or stress) of saying thank you for everything but I’m leaving to one job and starting a new one. I’m still going to be working advertising so I think I’ll wear a black dress with my teal blazer. I would’ve gone to TJ Maxx when I got back to the city but they closed for the day. 

3) Happy opening to The Cripple of Inishmaan tonight! I’ll be seeing you on Tuesday night with a friend that I haven’t seen in way too long.

4) I think I’m going to have to go see Hedwig again very soon (or you know, attempt the lottery again soon). The original off-Broadway cast recording has been bringing some tears to my eyes lately. (Read my review from last weekend here.) 

Writing about If/Then is something I’ve been tossing around in my mind for several days now. I saw it two weeks ago in (obviously) amazing seats and I love the cast, but I’m not sure what I thought about the show as a whole.

The show tells the story of a woman named Elizabeth (Menzel) who moves back to New York City after 10 yeas of living with her husband in Arizona and the two ways her life could’ve played out based on one decision in a park the day she returns. I’d heard that it was incredibly confusing in DC and I was sitting (by chance) next to a friend who’d seen it there but said the only difference was that in one of her “lifes” she would put on glasses. This definitely help make things a bit clearer, but things were still a bit confusing.

The score is beautiful and I could definitely relate to Elizabeth’s worrying and overanalyzing personality (unfortunately). Anthony Rapp as her best friend Lucas was wonderful, of course, but I don’t know if I believed that he was in love with Elizabeth. LaChanze brought down the house as per usual when she’s onstage as Elizabeth’s other best friend Kate. James Snyder (Menzel’s husband in one life, Josh) and Jerry Dixon (Menzel’s boss in the other life) were both lovely too.

The bit of confusion in the actual plot aside, I was left wondering why I should really care about Elizabeth. I knew both sides of the story, what was left to wonder? Her story didn’t end up being extraordinary either way. But one thing that I did like the fact that she ended up meeting Josh one way or another.

After seeing the show I learned that it was never meant to be your typical linear story but it was only changed to be that way after the confusion of average theatregoers (who’d probably have been happier watching My Fair Lady) down in DC. I’d love to listen to Kitt and Yorkey talk about writing this…

Anyways, if this review sparked your interest in the show, then you should definitely go see it. 

As long as I’m still under 35, I’m going to take advantage of HipTix as I did a couple of weekends ago when I saw a preview of Violet at Roundabout’s American Airlines Theatre. I’d worked on a production of the show during my junior year of college and I loved the music and the show, despite it’s heaviness in religion. I’d really wanted to catch the weekend-only workshop at Encore’s last year but I was thrilled when Roundabout announced it as part of their season.

The star of Violet is really Joshua Henry as Flick. He brings down the house every time he opens his mouth and you almost forget that Sutton Foster is even in the cast. That’s not to say that Foster isn’t great - she is, as she always is, but Henry just steals the show. Colin Donnell was also pretty great as Flick’s partner-in-crime, Monty. 

Violet is simple, not flashy, and beautifully sung by a top-notch cast. Good job, Roundabout.