that girl allison

I'm Allison. I see a ton of theatre. I'm a fan of Green Day, Ted Leo & the Pharmacists, Weezer, Oasis, Adam Rapp, Emily Giffin, and Shakespeare. I run sometimes, and do yoga always.

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thatgirlallison08 at gmail dot com

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Posts tagged "a little bit married"
I saw the author, Hannah Seligson, speak on some VH1 special once and it sparked an interest in reading her book, A Little Bit Married. 
I found it horrifically offensive at first, almost to the point where I was angry while turning the pages on the C train.  Most of the book was hard to swallow (insert sexual inuendo here) but the first 50 or so pages were especially difficult.  It’s so ridiculous that Generation Y is still seen as kids (regardless if we’re living on our own, have a job, support ourselves, etc) simply because we haven’t paid the government for a marriage certificate yet.  The book essentially says that we, Generation Y, will not reach adulthood until we’re married. Well, as Lily Allen once sang, fuck you very much, Hannah.   
The book goes on to talk about ways to approach your significant other about setting a marriage timeline (I guess these people only have one goal in life to reach then?), the benefits of marriage workshops, the fact that the younger you get married the more likely you are to get divorced (duh), and whether or not living together before marriage is a positive thing (the book leans towards no).  It also talks about how women still do most of the house work before they marry their significant other  (if they’re living together) and basically have two jobs (because they have to come home to cook and clean after their 9-5). It also states that men LOVE the “a little bit married” situation because they have basically another mother (that they can also sleep with) - someone who will cook and clean for them, but no legal obligations and they can move out whenever they want. 
This was an extremely interesting read (I got through it very quickly), but it’s made me more skeptical of marriage.  I think it’s also time for Gen Y to re-define what “adulthood” means.  “Adulthood” doesn’t mean marriage anymore (thank god) and can someone let Generation X know this? 

I saw the author, Hannah Seligson, speak on some VH1 special once and it sparked an interest in reading her book, A Little Bit Married

I found it horrifically offensive at first, almost to the point where I was angry while turning the pages on the C train.  Most of the book was hard to swallow (insert sexual inuendo here) but the first 50 or so pages were especially difficult.  It’s so ridiculous that Generation Y is still seen as kids (regardless if we’re living on our own, have a job, support ourselves, etc) simply because we haven’t paid the government for a marriage certificate yet.  The book essentially says that we, Generation Y, will not reach adulthood until we’re married. Well, as Lily Allen once sang, fuck you very much, Hannah.   

The book goes on to talk about ways to approach your significant other about setting a marriage timeline (I guess these people only have one goal in life to reach then?), the benefits of marriage workshops, the fact that the younger you get married the more likely you are to get divorced (duh), and whether or not living together before marriage is a positive thing (the book leans towards no).  It also talks about how women still do most of the house work before they marry their significant other  (if they’re living together) and basically have two jobs (because they have to come home to cook and clean after their 9-5). It also states that men LOVE the “a little bit married” situation because they have basically another mother (that they can also sleep with) - someone who will cook and clean for them, but no legal obligations and they can move out whenever they want. 

This was an extremely interesting read (I got through it very quickly), but it’s made me more skeptical of marriage.  I think it’s also time for Gen Y to re-define what “adulthood” means.  “Adulthood” doesn’t mean marriage anymore (thank god) and can someone let Generation X know this?