that girl allison

I'm Allison. I see a ton of theatre. I'm a huge fan of Green Day, Ted Leo & the Pharmacists, Weezer, Oasis, Adam Rapp, Emily Giffin, and Shakespeare. I run sometimes, and do yoga always. My life has changed a lot in the last year, so this is my account of it all.

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thatgirlallison08 at gmail dot com

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Posts tagged "a free man of color"
It was a LCT-filled week last week after I saw A Free Man of Color, by John Guare, on Saturday night at the Vivian Beaumont Theatre in Lincoln Center, starring Mos (formerly known as Mos Def), Jeffrey Wright, and John McMartin, among others.  A historical script about New Orleans’ colorful culture right before the historical Louisiana Purchase, bringing American law to New Orleans.  Since it’s 1801, that means it’ll be bringing slavery as well.
I felt the script was a bit convoluted and I had trouble figure out what was happening a lot of the time, hence my inability to remember what exactly happened.  I think Jacques Cornet (pictured on the playbill above) was sold into slavery as soon as the purchase took place, and I remember the end being very depressing.
Besides the hard-to-follow script, the scenery was beautiful as per usual at the Vivian Beaumont; the costumes were also breathtaking, and the cast was spot-on (at least, I think).  
If you’re thinking of checking this out at Lincoln Center, I’d suggest to sit up close and read a thorough synopsis beforehand (I did not, and that is probably where I went wrong).
(photo via)

It was a LCT-filled week last week after I saw A Free Man of Color, by John Guare, on Saturday night at the Vivian Beaumont Theatre in Lincoln Center, starring Mos (formerly known as Mos Def), Jeffrey Wright, and John McMartin, among others.  A historical script about New Orleans’ colorful culture right before the historical Louisiana Purchase, bringing American law to New Orleans.  Since it’s 1801, that means it’ll be bringing slavery as well.

I felt the script was a bit convoluted and I had trouble figure out what was happening a lot of the time, hence my inability to remember what exactly happened.  I think Jacques Cornet (pictured on the playbill above) was sold into slavery as soon as the purchase took place, and I remember the end being very depressing.

Besides the hard-to-follow script, the scenery was beautiful as per usual at the Vivian Beaumont; the costumes were also breathtaking, and the cast was spot-on (at least, I think).  

If you’re thinking of checking this out at Lincoln Center, I’d suggest to sit up close and read a thorough synopsis beforehand (I did not, and that is probably where I went wrong).

(photo via)